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Facebook, Twitter, Email, Fox News, And Millennials

Andrew Kordek

The rhetoric at some industry conferences is starting to sound like Fox News. I recently attended a social media conference where a panelist tweeted, “Should I drop the f-bomb today?” before he got on stage and then proceeded to do so at the encouragement of several attendees.

Apparently, the goal is to secure the next speaking spot by shocking the audience and getting attendees tweeting. To get recognized you need to say something more profound than the last person. If saying something more profound is too hard, just saying something more ridiculous will get the job done, too.

This game of tweet-byte one-upmanship puts us at risk of losing touch with reality. Watch Fox News long enough and you’ll be nodding your head when Glenn Beck unveils his theories on the philosophical likenesses of Obama, Chairman Mao and Hilter. Similarly, isolate yourself among those who pay their mortgage talking about the latest social media trends and you may find yourself agreeing that if it doesn’t happen on Twitter, it probably doesn’t matter.

I’m not trying to slam Fox News or social media enthusiasts. Both play legitimate roles. I’m just encouraging us to pay special attention to when our heads start nodding. When it happens, ask yourself, “Have I just crossed the line from passionate to delusional?”

Continue Reading on MediaPost: Engage: GenY

Originally From ‘Facebook, Twitter, Email, Fox News, And Millennials’| Published July 16, 2010

About the Author(s)

Andrew Kordek

Andrew Kordek is a Co-Founder of Trendline Interactive.

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