3 email design principles that beat the creative silver bullet 

3 email design principles that beat the creative silver bullet 

Life – and email – don't come with guarantees. Although we know what doesn't work in email design, no single design solution - the silver bullet - will work every time.    However, email does have general principles that designers should follow to give subscribers the best possible experience: an email message that looks good across browsers and devices, serves their needs, encourages them to act and portrays your brand in the best light possible.   1. Follow good email design practices for every campaign. Email design is more creative than ever, with new approaches to image and copy combinations, images, animations and video and even real-time content adding impact to every message . But every design should follow these basic best practices that encourage your subscribers to open and act on your emails. Make subject lines, preheaders and headlines work together.  We see many email messages that use the subject line content in the preheader (the first line of copy in the message that often...
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15 Questions with Interactive Designer Becca Pierpoint

15 Questions with Interactive Designer Becca Pierpoint

Design involves far more than just making something look nice. And designing emails is an art form unto itself. Just ask Becca, one of the interactive designers in TLi's Portland office. What does an interactive designer do? Basically, I design the emails you interact with in your inbox! While I’m not necessarily creating a literal email, I’ll mock up in Photoshop what the email will look like. I make sure the email is not only excellent on a visual level, but I also form a narrative with my layout that will bring to life the client’s goals for the project. Tell us about how you came to work here at Trendline?  What motivated you to want to work on email? I started working here when I moved to Portland and needed a new job. I loved the idea of working in email because it’s a fast-moving environment. You spend two weeks on a project, rather than six months or year. This is exciting and...
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Is Your Email Searchable? Can Everyone Read it?

Is Your Email Searchable? Can Everyone Read it?

Email needs to be pretty. There’s no doubt about it. Content presented in an ugly package just isn’t going to give you results you intended. It is like a beautiful plate of Nantucket bay scallops, adorned with delicate peppery microgreens, flecks of tangy lemon zets, and glistening jewels of roe - put into a Blendtec will it blend. It just isn’t as appetizing as this particular dish. But in addition to making it pretty and graphical, you need to make is searchable. Gmail can’t read jpgs. I can’t click on a jpg on my mobile phone and call you. Sometime we just need text. We need to be able to search our emails.  We need to be able to contact you with a single click. Don’t make take five steps to call you when I should only take one. Don’t make me scroll through 2,156 email just to find yours. By the time I get to yours, my impulse to buy or...
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Email Design for the Macbook Pro with Retina Display

Email Design for the Macbook Pro with Retina Display

After a month on my new Macbook Pro with Retina Display, "reading" about 300-400 HTML emails a day, I've got some early thoughts for you on the implications for email design on this new desktop paradigm. (Email Clients used for this post: Apple Mail, Outlook for Mac, Sparrow, and Webmail clients through Safari) It's not as bad as we thought. When the Retina Display made it's inevitable landing on the desktop in the new Macbook Pro, my first thought was not a positive one. Considering the limitations our draconian email client overlords have placed on email design, how could our emails look anything other than awful with an extra 3 million pixels thrown into the mix? Well, to use my favorite backhanded compliment, it's "actually not that bad". Sure there is a blurriness to certain types of images (we'll get to that), but the overall email experience doesn't suffer. The snappiness of the solid state drive (Photoshop opens in 2 seconds!) actually seems to...
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